About Philip Kingston


Philip Kingston’s journey to Dallas City Hall to represent District 14 on the Dallas City Council began nearly 20 years ago. It all started when Kingston, who had recently received his JD in General Civil Litigation from Baylor University in 1999, became active in his neighborhood in District 14 in Dallas. And his goal in representing District 14 has always been clear: total transparency.

It is this belief in transparency and being an accessible representative to his constituents which earned Kingston the distinction of being named the “Best Public Official” by D Magazine.

He believed that District 14, which includes Downtown Dallas, Uptown, East Dallas, Lower Greenville, Turtle Creek and Oak Lawn, would benefit from a community advocate who not only lived in the area but was aware of the specific issues that face the residents of those iconic Dallas neighborhoods.

On June 24, 2013, Philip Kingston was elected to serve District 14 on the Dallas City Council. One of the first goals for the district that he set out to achieve was to restore and improve the Lower Greenville entertainment in East Dallas. Crime and empty storefronts were quickly replaced, under the guidance of Kingston, with pedestrian-friendly sidewalks, increased neighborhood patrols and dozens of new restaurants and bars.

During his two terms on the Dallas city council, Philip Kingston was named as the Chair of the Ad Hoc Judicial Nominations Committee; Vice Chair of the Budget, Finance and Audit Committee and as a member of the Police & Fire Pension Board, Public Safety Committee, and Quality of Life and Environment Committee.

In an example of his dedication to total transparency, one of the biggest goals of Kingston’s terms has been using his background in law and his tenacity to fight to help solve the pension crisis facing Dallas police officers and firefighters. He believes that it is his duty as a public servant to protect those who protect the citizens of Dallas and risk their lives every day.

Another issue facing the residents of District 14 is the homeless problem in Dallas. It was Philip Kingston who received widespread praise for his plan to repurpose older, abandoned buildings in the city as emergency shelters for the homeless.

Philip has taken on some of the city’s toughest challenges. He is an advocate for city workers and for the reintegration of ex-offenders into our economy. For his successful efforts to pay city contractors a living wage, the local chapter of the AFL-CIO recognized him as the Champion of the Living Wage Ordinance. This commitment includes Philip marching in solidarity with teachers and UAW members.

Philip is a strong advocate for LGBT constituents and is a two-time winner of the LGBT Task Force’s Spirit of Equality Ally Award. This commitment to equality is part of his bigger goal to protect all citizens of District 14 and Dallas from discrimination based on sexual orientation, religion, race, gender, ethnicity or socioeconomic status.

Representing the hottest development areas in Dallas, Philip is recognized as a zoning, land use, and economic development expert. District 14 projects he has been involved in have resulted in over a billion dollars of new property value for the city.

In his professional career as a lawyer, Philip has been recognized as a Rising Star by Texas Monthly Magazine in 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009, and 2011. He is a founding member of the Dallas Bar Association’s Public Forum Committee and was chair in 2010. In that role, he has brought some of the most important civic leaders in Dallas to the Bar for speaking events and debates. Philip has a long-standing commitment to legal services to the poor having received the Dallas Volunteer Attorney Program’s Outstanding Clinic Attorney of the Year Award three times for his work at the West Dallas Clinic.

A record of every vote that Philip Kingston has cast at Dallas City Hall as the councilman for District 14 can be found here.

EDUCATION

Baylor Law School, JD General Civil Litigation, 1999
Trinity University, BA Economics, 1994